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In 1942 Marceline and Francine Dumoulin left their mountain home to milk their cows – neither one of them would ever see their home – or their seven children – again.

Marceline and Francine Dumoulin
Marceline and Francine Dumoulin

75 years later, authorities found two, “perfectly preserved” bodies uncovered on a melting Swiss ski resort of missing Swiss couple.

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Regional police have a list going back to 1925 of missing people. They note that because of climate change, bodies of people missing for decades regularly emerge from receding glaciers.

The daughter of the couple who disappeared in the Swiss Alps has said that the discovery of two bodies emerging from a melting glacier has brought her a “deep sense of calm” after so long without an answer.

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Grim Discovery

79-year-old Marceline Udry Dumoulin told Le Matin newspaper that she and her siblings “spent our whole lives looking for them, without stopping. We thought that we could give them the funeral they deserved one day.” Marceline, 40 was a shoemaker, and Francine, 37 was a teacher.

bodies of Marceline and Francine Dumoulin found due to melting glacier

“Their bodies were lying next to each other, It was a man and a woman wearing clothing dating from the period of World War II. They were perfectly preserved in the glacier and their belongings were intact,” Les Diablerets resort director, Bernhard Tschannen told the local media outlet, Le Matin.

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It is thought that the couple may have fallen into a crevice on the Tsanfleuron Glacier, where they were preserved until now until the receding glacier gave up the bodies.

Urdy is the youngest of seven children born to Marceline and Francine Dumoulin. The Swiss couple went to milk their cows on a meadow about their home in Switzerland’s Valais canton on August 15, 1942, and never came home.

“It was the first time my mother went with him on such an excursion. She was always pregnant(she had seven children) and couldn’t climb in the difficult conditions of a glacier,” said Urdy.

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Urdy and her sibling went to different households after their parents disappeared and over the decades they lost touch with each other.

This heeled shoe belongs to Francine Dumbulin, who was a teacher when she vanished in 1942.
This heeled shoe belongs to Francine Dumbulin, who was a teacher when she vanished in 1942.

Marcelin and Francine’s mummified bodies were discovered in an extremely well-preserved state – due to the freezing and dry conditions of the glaciers which slows down the deterioration process. The bodies were found with boots, mitts, backpacks, and also a bottle and a watch.

“After a while, we children were separated and placed in families. We all lived in the region but became strangers,” said Udry Dumoulin.

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The black, almost charred looking bodies were found by an employee of the ski station, ash he made what he thought was a routine inspection tour at an altitude of 2,600 meters.

“From afar, it looked like small rocks, but there were too many in the same place,” said Tschannen.

According to the local Swiss Newspaper Le Mating, who reported the findings first – these aren’t the first bodies to have been pulled from a snowy region.

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According to National Geographic, Since 1925, 280 people have been listed as missing in the Alps or nearby regions.

Over the years many bodies have appeared – – Three brothers who disappeared in 1926 were found later in 2012. A climber who fell in 1954 was later recovered in 2008. A couple who lost in the mountain was later found in 2012.

A study published in 2006 made a serious prediction – the ice would be gone by 2100 during summers and even more dire predictions in 2007 when it was said that the ice would vanish by 2050.

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“Every year we lose a meter or half a meter of ice, Eighty years ago this glacier was much bigger than it is now. “

Although it’s a sad story, Urdy won’t be wearing black to the upcoming funeral. She wished to wear white, as it would be more appropriate – it represents hope, the hope that she never lost.

“For the funeral, I won’t wear black. I think that white would be more appropriate. It represents hope, which I never lost.”


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